Meet the Maker: Mazama Wares

Oct 22, 2014

It’s hard to find a wheel thrown production pottery studio that does this so well, and these folks pay a great deal of attention to consistency and design. ”Even though everything we make is hand thrown, we have a very tight standard when it comes to size and shape,” says co-founder Meghan Wright.

“We wanted to make pieces that are simple, timeless, and felt amazing in your hand, and while you drink. We obsessed over the lip of our cups, as well as the handle design until they felt just right.”

The designs of the cups and vessels are very considered before ever even taking clay to wheel – each piece begins with a pencil sketch, next a computer rendering, and finally the pieces are created in clay on the wheel. After a piece is thrown on the wheel, it is dried for a day, then flipped over and trimmed.

This is when the stamp is applied to the bottom. Next, the handle is added. Once completely dry, the mugs are fired in a bisque kiln program. The bisque ware is then carefully sanded and checked for flaws, then the glaze is applied.

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Meghan says, “The best part of the design process is testing them out, or ‘Research Drinking’ as we like to call it. Have to make sure our favorite beverages taste good in there, right?”

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We can relate the family vibe of the studio and can certainly get behind the folks of Mazama who really rally behind creating a community of people drinking things together.

Our custom, limited-edition, hand-thrown Mazama X Stumptown stoneware mug hits the online shop today.