The Tocto Family

We rarely see as many improvements year over year as we have seen with Eber Tocto and his family. They have united in their efforts to make changes to improve quality in order to reap the benefits of sustaining a Direct Trade relationship over many years. The Tocto family produced our Churupampa lot on their 15 hectare farm near the small town of Chirinos in the Department of Cajamarca. Rosalios, the patriarch of the family, purchased the land over 20 years ago specifically to produce coffee. His son expanded the land and promotes quality coffee production. They focus on selecting healthy seeds, replanting and plant nutrition.

Partnered with Stumptown

2013

Varieties

Typica, Caturra and Pache

Processing techniques

Washed

What’s new

Last year the Toctos expanded their network to 108 additional farmers.

The Producer

The Tocto family produced our Churupampa lot on their 15 hectare farm near the small town of Chirinos in the Department of Cajamarca. Rosalios, the patriarch of the family, purchased the land over 20 years ago specifically to produce coffee. His son expanded the land and promotes quality coffee production. They focus on selecting healthy seeds, replanting and plant nutrition.

The Place

They invested in building a road to reach the upper limits of the farm to ease transportation of cherry. Prior to the road, they transported the coffee down the slope on donkeys and mules. The road is so steep it becomes impassable during the heavy rainy season.

The Process

The family continues to cultivate their coffee with no herbicides or pesticides. For plant nutrition, they use compost made from local materials. Local guinea pigs, which remain an important source of protein in the region, provide manure which enhances the compost. To increase and vary their access to protein, they recently built three cascading trout ponds.

The Tocto family invested heavily back into their farm and processing in both 2014 and 2015. Their stunning crop yields demonstrate their improved soil management. They also rearranged their wet mill, and built two new fermentation tanks, a grading and washing channel and a new drying structure

Using a hand cranked depulper, they depulp their coffee into tiled tanks where they ferment it. They then wash and grade it in channels. The Tocto family dries the parchment on raised solar beds covered in plastic. Covering the drying beds is vital, due to the heavy rains and stifling humidity in the area near harvest time.